Black Cumin Seeds – Ingredient Spotlight

B L A C K  C U M I N  S E E D S

Scientific Name: Nigella sativa
Alternative Names: Black cumin, Kalonji, Kala jeera, or Nigella seeds

We use black cumin seeds in EVERY single one of our mixture products. That’s how nutritious they are. Their nutritional profile contains almost everything. So just adding even a little to our formulas, boost the nutrition content greatly. They are high in fibre, iron, sodium, calcium, potassium, all amino acids, as well as vitamins A, C, E, K, and B6.

Black cumin belongs to the Ranunculaceae family. Its pungent seeds are used as a spice and in botanical medicine.

The cumin plant grows in Southwestern Asia, the Mediterranean, and Africa. The smell of the plant is similar to the fennel. It has an oppressive flavor which is similar to nutmeg.

On roasting and grounding the seeds, they become a spice, which is used in the Middle East, India, and parts of North Africa to season rice, bread, curries, and desserts.

Furthermore, the black seeds are also used in herbal medicine for the remedy of various diseases.

Other Amazing Benefits of Black Cumin Seeds:

  • Black cumin seeds have antioxidant properties which helps to kill the harmful free radicals that cause chronic diseases eg heart disease and cancer.
  • Help to lower cholesterol levels which can also lead to heart disease
  • They contain anti-bacterial properties which help to kill bacteria that cause ear infection and pneumonia.
  • Effective for skin infection treatments
  • Good for liver health as they help to remove toxins and absorbed drugs
  • Help to maintain blood sugar levels to prevent diabetes
  • Helps to prevent stomach ulcers
  • Suppresses appetite so can be effective for weight loss
  • Extremely beneficial for your gut!

Vitamins & Minerals

100 grams of black cumin seeds contains:

  • Dietary Fibre: 11 grams
  • Protein: 18 grams
  • Iron: 66.4 mg
  • Calcium: 931 mg
  • Potassium: 1788 mg
  • Vitamin A: 1270 IU

FUN FACT:

In ancient times, the ground seeds was actually put in a shaker and used the way we add salt and pepper to shakers nowadays! That’s how popular it was. This tradition began in Morocco.

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